A. Allan Martin

A. Allan Martin, PhD, CFLE, is associate professor of discipleship and family ministry, Andrews University Theological Seminary, Berrien Springs, Michigan, United States.

Engaging Adventist Millennials: A church that embraces relationships

The Barna Group surveyed Millennials who were (or had been) part of an Adventist congregation in order to understand their common experiences and attitudes. See some of the results.

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Problems with Modeling Clay

From our special revival and reformation feature.

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Mission President Accepts Challenge

AFTER the division council in Davao City, I decided to conduct an evangelistic effort in response to the challenge given by Robert H. Pierson, president of the General Conference. . .

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Mission President Accepts Challenge

RECENTLY, after the division council in Davao City, I decided to conduct an evangelistic effort in response to the challenge given by Robert H. Pierson, president of the General Conference. . .

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If I Were A Church Member

SOME time ago a religious journal ran a series of intriguing articles under the general title, "If I Were a Minister." Every article was written by a layman whose privilege it was to "sit under" a particular preacher Sunday by Sunday. Ministers were told firmly, yet kindly, all sorts of useful things how to preach, how to pray in public, how to visit the sick, how to counsel the perplexed, how to work happily with all sorts of people, how to look after the young and the middle-aged and the old, how to deal with the strong-willed and with the tenderhearted members of the flock, how to manage the cranks who come along, and so on. . .

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Embracing those who reject religion: An interview with Roger Dudley

A foremost authority on youth ministries reflects upon 50 years of research to understand the spiritual experience of teenagers.

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Reaching out: Making a difference with young adults

I first learned the term, the bystander effect, in my undergraduate social psychology class. Wikipedia defines it as "a psychological phenomenon in which someone is less likely to intervene in an emergency situation when other people are present and able to help than when he or she is alone." The article references a variety of horrific incidences in which dozens of bystanders "stood by" and did nothing as homicides occurred before their eyes.

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