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March 1975

 

Editorial: Our Greatest Problem

FROM a dedicated pastor in Australia comes an eleven-page assessment of our real needs as a church. While acknowledging progress in the finishing of our task, he also faces up to the fact that something must be seriously wrong or we wouldn't be taking so long for the work to be completed. . .

 

Hints on Vienna

Questions about the the location of the General Conference Session

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Miriam's Travel Tips

WHEN I attended a workers' meeting in Florida in late 1974, one topic of conversation was the coming General Conference session in Vienna. Naturally we are all deeply interested in the problems of coping in a country not our own. Some will be going abroad for the very first time. It happens that "travel coping" is rather a hobby of mine and I found myself giving out with words of---if not wisdom---at least practicality, gleaned from a number of overseas trips. . .

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Archeological News

THOSE who desire to keep abreast of new developments in archeology may be interested in a brief report of the annual meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature and its progeny, the American Schools of Oriental Research, both of which met in Washington, D.C., October 24-27, 1974. . .

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The Missionary Doctor in South America

THE spirit of Christian evangelism is sweeping South America. In the vanguard of this endeavor is the medical evangelistic program of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In the large cities with their multimillions of inhabitants, in the Amazon jungles, in the vast prairie areas, the medical evangelist is diligently at work. . .

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Every Body Needs Some Fat!

THERE is always a lot of talk and discussion about the fat tissues of the human body. Perhaps we talk about it more than we should; however, everybody has and needs some fat. The Creator made us that way. . .

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Understanding the Alcoholic

THE attitude of the medical profession to the alcoholic is of great interest, and is certainly an index to the current state of affairs. Many physicians prefer not having an alcoholic among their patients for various reasons, such as feeling that better help is available else where, or not wanting to take the extra time that might be required, or fear of their inability to help him. . .

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Feelings Can Be Fatal

ALL OF us in this modern day and age must deal with stressful situations at one time or another. Many of us have different ways of dealing with the rising tide of anger and frustration and the resulting tension that we may feel. Some of us may present a calm exterior to those around us and may have learned to squelch these inner feelings of stress. While appearing calm on the surface we may burn with indignation and, consequently, indigestion. . .

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Howard's Problem

The Catholic Leader of March 25, 1973, printed a letter from a young man who simply signed himself "Howard." We missed the letter, but picked up a reprint of it in The Protestant Review of April, 1973. We would like to reproduce Howard's letter here. . .

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A New Concept--A Conference Bible Instructor

A CONFERENCE Bible instructor, available to the whole field, is the answer the Ohio Conference has adopted to meet the problem of "Not enough Bible instructors to go around."

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"Words Without Knowledge"

Thinking back over many years of committee work, I find that one particular type of individual has often captured my unhappy attention. It is the person who feels compelled to comment on every subject. Uninhibited by lack of knowledge and experience, he is an instant reactor. And his ideas are often as far out as they are fluently expressed. When he asks for the floor, the stifled feelings of exasperation around the room are almost audible. . .

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Amos-The Non-Prophet

FIVE MILES south of Bethlehem, on the border of the wilderness of Judea, lies a small town, which was known as Tekoa in the time of the Old Testament prophets. Agricultural endeavors stop in this vicinity, which is quite dry and bare, a semi-desert region. In such rather desolate areas the sycamore fig tree seems to flourish. It is a semi-wild tree, the fruit of which is eaten by the people of these regions. . .

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The Man God Uses

THE FACT that Cod uses men at all is a wonderful reality. From one point of view He doesn't need us. As Jesus once said, He could use stones if He wished, but He has chosen to use men. This means, of course, that He has chosen to use imperfect instruments. Yet our imperfection will not block God if our attitudes are such that we are willing to be used by Him. . .

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The Areopagus Revisited

AMONG Adventists there seems to be considerable antipathy for Mars' Hill and the approach to witness it has come to represent. This feeling apparently carries over to our attitude regarding Christian apologetics (the logical defense of the faith in the face of secular philosophical debunking). Many view this kind of apologetics as unnecessary; it's not the simple gospel. . .

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"Footprints in Stone"

THE FILM Footprints in Stone has enjoyed a wide circulation since its release a few months ago. Its reception has been enthusiastic. And well it might be. The film reports the finding of human or manlike tracks and closely associated dinosaur tracks in the Paluxy River bed near Glen Rose, Texas. . .

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The "Omega" of Apostasy

CHRISTENDOM IS currently in extremely poor shape in many areas of the world. Simply told, the story is one of dwindling membership, a dwindling ministry, and dwindling finances. . .

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The Saviour and His Sabbath (Part 3)

ONE ASPECT of the theme of the Sabbath's being made for man and not man for the Sabbath is of utmost importance and has not yet received the attention it requires: The Sabbath has a vital role in the plan of salvation. . .

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Serpents, Wolves, Doves, and Sheep

WE MINISTERS, regardless of the academic sophistication that seems to crown with a halo the art of counseling, are often faced with the need to counsel. In our attempts to help people solve their problems, we face certain pitfalls as counselors. Our calling as undershepherds does not guarantee immunity to falling into these traps. . .

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"Physican, Heal Thyself"

THE TAUNT that Jesus anticipated from His home town congregation at Nazareth consisted of the familiar Jewish proverb, "Physician, heal thyself." Jesus, of course, was the only Man who never needed that kind of ad monition. It is, however, most pertinent to those called by Christ to be physicians of the soul today. Before we can heal others we must find healing and restoration for ourselves. . .

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